Sail Battens

Installing and Securing Sail Battens

by By Bill Jeffers

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If you don't have the new black batten endcaps, get them from your local Hobie dealer. The earlier white caps with no jam cleat are very difficult to deal with. The new caps have a hole that allows you to get 2:1 advantage on the jib and 3:1 advantage on the main. 

To properly thread the jib batten ties and prevent the battens from coming oose while sailing: 

On the jib battens:
1.) Tie a small boline to one of the eyelets on the sail.
2.) Pass the batten tie line through the hole in the endcap.
3.) Then pass it through the other eyelet on the sail.
4.) Tension and cleat it in the the jam cleat.
5.) Tie a figure eight knot in the end of the batten tie line.
6.) Tuck the knoted end between the batten and the tensioned line going to the eyelet.
7.) Pull all the slack through.

Optional: Wrap tape around the batten end and 12" forward on each side of the sail. (Jib only)

If the jib battens are cut short (as they should be) then step 6 may be difficult. You can tuck before tensioning but leave enough slack so that you can properly tension. step order (1,2,3,5,6,4,7).

On the Main battens:
1.) Tie a small boline through one of the holes in the batten cap.
2.) Pass the batten tie line through one of the eyelets in the sail.
3.) Then pass it through the other hole in the batten cap.
4.) Then pass it through the other eyelet on the sail.
5.) Tension and cleat it in the the jam cleat.
6.) Tie a figure eight knot in the end of the batten tie line.
7.) Tuck the knoted end between the batten and the tensioned line going to the eyelet.
8.) Pull all the slack through.

When done in this manner nothing, you cannot have a batten come loose or fall out unless the batten tie breaks. Inspect your batten ties periodically.

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